Oh, Pinot Noir, the darling of the wine world! This light-bodied red is adored for its delicate red fruit, floral and spice aromas that tantalize the senses. It’s a wine that is meant to be savored, with its smooth finish that lingers on the palate. It’s an elegant, refined wine that will always leave a lasting impression. If you haven’t tried Pinot Noir yet, you’re missing out on one of the world’s most beloved varietals.

How Do You Pronounce Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is pronounced “pee-no n’war”

What is Pinot Noir also known as

Pinot Noir is also known as “Pinot Nero” in Italy, “Blauburgunder” in Germany, “Spätburgunder” in Germany, “Blauer Spätburgunder” in Austria, “Klevner” in Alsace, France, “Bla Pinot” in Savoie, France, “Svatovavrinecke” in Czech Republic, “Szürkebarát” in Hungary, “Modry Pinot” in Slovakia and “Rozele” in Romania.

What does Pinot Noir Taste Like

Taste profile

Dry, Medium Body, Low Tannins, Medium-high Acidity, 11.5–13.5% ABV

Primary Flavours

Cherry, Raspberry, Mushroom, Clove, Hibiscus

Storage & Handling

When it comes to serving Pinot Noir, it’s all about finding the perfect balance of temperature and aroma. The ideal serving temperature for Pinot Noir is between 55-60°F (12-15°C), this allows all the complex aromas and flavors to fully express themselves. To truly appreciate the wine’s bouquet, use an aroma collector glass, it will help to concentrate the wine’s fragrances and make the experience more enjoyable.

If you’re opening an older bottle, decanting the wine for about 30 minutes before serving will help to separate the sediment and bring out the wine’s full potential. And for those who are looking to age their Pinot Noir, it can cellar well for 10+ years with proper storage.

Food Pairing

What do you pair with Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is a versatile wine that pairs beautifully with a wide range of dishes, including succulent poultry, tender pork, and rich salmon. Its delicate yet complex flavor profile also complements earthy mushrooms and truffles perfectly. For a lighter pairing, try it with a salad or grilled vegetables. On the cheese board, look for brie, camembert, and goat cheese to pair with your Pinot Noir, it will elevate the taste to a new level.

Where is Pinot Noir grown 

Burgundy, France

Burgundy, France is known for producing some of the most sought-after Pinot Noir wines in the world. The region is divided into two main sub-regions: the Côte d’Or, which is further divided into the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune, and the Côte Chalonnaise. The Côte d’Or produces the most famous and expensive Pinot Noir wines, while the Côte Chalonnaise produces more affordable wines. Some of the most renowned and iconic Burgundy Pinot Noir wines come from the villages of Gevrey-Chambertin, Chablis, and Nuits-St-Georges.

Willamette Valley, Oregon

In the United States, the Willamette Valley in Oregon is considered one of the most highly-regarded regions for producing Pinot Noir. The region’s cool climate and volcanic soils provide the perfect conditions for growing the grape. The region’s wineries are known for producing Pinot Noir wines with a unique combination of elegance and power.

Central Otago, New Zealand

Central Otago in New Zealand is the southernmost wine-growing region in the world and is known for producing high-quality Pinot Noir. The region’s cool climate and diverse soils contribute to the wine’s unique character. The wines from Central Otago are known for their bright fruit flavors and firm tannins.

Sonoma Country, California

Sonoma County, California is another region known for producing high-quality Pinot Noir. The region’s diverse microclimates and soils provide the perfect conditions for growing the grape. The Russian River Valley in Sonoma County is particularly renowned for producing Pinot Noir with a unique balance of fruit, acidity, and tannins. The wines from this region are known for their complexity and aging potential.

Other Regions To Research

The Mornington Peninsula, Yarra Valley, and Adelaide Hills regions in Australia

The Baden and Württemberg regions in Germany

The Casablanca Valley in Chile

The Valle de Uco in Argentina

The Martinborough, Central Otago, and Marlborough regions in New Zealand

What is Pinot Noir

Oh, Pinot Noir, the darling of the wine world! This light-bodied red is adored for its delicate red fruit, floral and spice aromas that tantalize the senses. It’s a wine that is meant to be savored, with its smooth finish that lingers on the palate. It’s an elegant, refined wine that will always leave a lasting impression. If you haven’t tried Pinot Noir yet, you’re missing out on one of the world’s most beloved varietals.

How Do You Pronounce Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is pronounced “pee-no n’war”

What is Pinot Noir also known as

Pinot Noir is also known as “Pinot Nero” in Italy, “Blauburgunder” in Germany, “Spätburgunder” in Germany, “Blauer Spätburgunder” in Austria, “Klevner” in Alsace, France, “Bla Pinot” in Savoie, France, “Svatovavrinecke” in Czech Republic, “Szürkebarát” in Hungary, “Modry Pinot” in Slovakia and “Rozele” in Romania.

What does Pinot Noir Taste Like

Taste profile

Dry, Medium Body, Low Tannins, Medium-high Acidity, 11.5–13.5% ABV

Primary Flavours

Cherry, Raspberry, Mushroom, Clove, Hibiscus

Storage & Handling

When it comes to serving Pinot Noir, it’s all about finding the perfect balance of temperature and aroma. The ideal serving temperature for Pinot Noir is between 55-60°F (12-15°C), this allows all the complex aromas and flavors to fully express themselves. To truly appreciate the wine’s bouquet, use an aroma collector glass, it will help to concentrate the wine’s fragrances and make the experience more enjoyable.

If you’re opening an older bottle, decanting the wine for about 30 minutes before serving will help to separate the sediment and bring out the wine’s full potential. And for those who are looking to age their Pinot Noir, it can cellar well for 10+ years with proper storage.

Food Pairing

What do you pair with Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is a versatile wine that pairs beautifully with a wide range of dishes, including succulent poultry, tender pork, and rich salmon. Its delicate yet complex flavor profile also complements earthy mushrooms and truffles perfectly. For a lighter pairing, try it with a salad or grilled vegetables. On the cheese board, look for brie, camembert, and goat cheese to pair with your Pinot Noir, it will elevate the taste to a new level.

Where is Pinot Noir grown 

Burgundy, France

Burgundy, France is known for producing some of the most sought-after Pinot Noir wines in the world. The region is divided into two main sub-regions: the Côte d’Or, which is further divided into the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune, and the Côte Chalonnaise. The Côte d’Or produces the most famous and expensive Pinot Noir wines, while the Côte Chalonnaise produces more affordable wines. Some of the most renowned and iconic Burgundy Pinot Noir wines come from the villages of Gevrey-Chambertin, Chablis, and Nuits-St-Georges.

Willamette Valley, Oregon

In the United States, the Willamette Valley in Oregon is considered one of the most highly-regarded regions for producing Pinot Noir. The region’s cool climate and volcanic soils provide the perfect conditions for growing the grape. The region’s wineries are known for producing Pinot Noir wines with a unique combination of elegance and power.

Central Otago, New Zealand

Central Otago in New Zealand is the southernmost wine-growing region in the world and is known for producing high-quality Pinot Noir. The region’s cool climate and diverse soils contribute to the wine’s unique character. The wines from Central Otago are known for their bright fruit flavors and firm tannins.

Sonoma Country, California

Sonoma County, California is another region known for producing high-quality Pinot Noir. The region’s diverse microclimates and soils provide the perfect conditions for growing the grape. The Russian River Valley in Sonoma County is particularly renowned for producing Pinot Noir with a unique balance of fruit, acidity, and tannins. The wines from this region are known for their complexity and aging potential.

Other Regions To Research

The Mornington Peninsula, Yarra Valley, and Adelaide Hills regions in Australia

The Baden and Württemberg regions in Germany

The Casablanca Valley in Chile

The Valle de Uco in Argentina

The Martinborough, Central Otago, and Marlborough regions in New Zealand